Thursday, June 20, 2013

Please Pass the Mustard...

By Ralph McDevitt


With the arrival of summer at 1:04 a.m. ET on June 21 also comes the beginning of one of the tastiest times of the year – hot dog eating season. The quintessential American entrĂ©e is synonymous with summertime. And whether you intend to ingest your favorite frank directly from your backyard grill, at a baseball game or from your local street corner vendor, there are certain rules you must abide by to be a true hot dog aficionado. The National Hot Dog and Sausage Council, which actually exists, stands by these very real rules of hot dog eating etiquette.

First of all, you must know that it is two words – hot dog. A hotdog is someone who shows off, and that is simply poor etiquette.

Secondly, condiments should be applied in the proper order: wet condiments like mustard and chili go first, followed by chunky condiments like relish, onions, sauerkraut, and cheese (shredded only) and then spices. Ketchup is unacceptable, unless you are under the age of 18.

You should take no more than five bites to eat a hot dog, seven bites if it is a footlong. Any less than that and you are a glutton. Any more and you are just showing off with your delicious redhot, which we have already established is poor etiquette.

And if you are wondering what wine goes best with your bunned, steaming cylinder of savory goodness, then just stop. Because beer, soda, lemonade or iced tea are the only appropriate beverage accompaniments. You can have wine with your hot dog, sure, but only if you want to show off. Tsk-tsk.

But the one true rule of eating hot dogs that trumps all these is this: Forget what anybody or any national council says, because there is no wrong way to enjoy a great summertime hot dog.

I hope you have a wonderful summer with lots of fun times with your family and friends!

Monday, June 17, 2013

Trek's Project One Custom Bike Program - Wow!

We might talk a lot about Trek bikes lately, but that's because they are coming out with so many awesome things lately. What's more, we at Bikeworks love being a part of it.

Trek recently announced the expansion of their unique Project One customization program to include their most popular mountain bike models. The models available for customization include:
  • Superfly 9.9SL
  • Superfly FS 9.9 SL
  • Fuel EX 9.9 29
There are about twenty-two custom options including:
  • Frame
  • Colors
  • Graphics
  • Shocks
  • Drivetrains
  • Fork, including custom colors
  • Shifters
  • Wheelsets
  • ... and more!
Come on in and our expert team can put together the look you want, and order it when you are ready.


Thursday, June 6, 2013

Adjusting Your Shimano Di2 Front Derailleurs in Ten Easy Steps

Velo News' "Ask a Mechanic" takes us through the step-by-step process of tuning Shimano D12 Front Derailleurs



A poorly adjusted derailleur can cause your chain to rub and gears to shift and drop unexpectedly. You can avoid these problems, especially on a steep climb or during other conditions by setting limit screws, adjusting your front derailleur and adjusting cable tension.

Click here, or on the image at right for the "how to" video, or, we've included the ten step process below.


Required materials:
5 mm Allen key and a small Phillip's head screwdriver

Derailleur Adjustment

1.  Set the limit screws with a Phillips head screwdriver so that the derailleur does not shift or move the chain off the chain rings.

2.  Shift so that your chain is in the lowest gear, which is the smallest chain ring in the front and largest in the back.

3.  Set the L-limit screw (the one closest to your frame) with a Phillips head screwdriver so the derailleur cage closest to your bike is about 2 mm away from the smallest chain ring.

4.  Shift to the highest gear, with the largest chain ring in the front and smallest in the back.

5.  Set the H-limit screw so that the derailleur cage plate farthest from your frame is about 2 mm away from the largest chain ring.

6.  Pull, with your finger or a pair of pliers, the derailleur's cable away from the bike to eliminate slack, then tighten the cable bolt (located on the cable pinch bolt above the front derailleur) with the 5 mm Allen key.

7.  Shift between your two or three (depending on derailleur) chain rings. If your chain does not easily shift or if it rubs, fine-tune the derailleur by increasing the tension with a shifter cable adjustment (see below).

Shifter Cable Adjustment

8.  Shift to largest sprocket in both the front and the back.

9.  Turn the cable adjustment bolt (located on the cable leading to the front derailleur) counter clockwise about three turns.

10. Shift the bike through all gears, high and low. If the chain does not transfer smoothly, continue to turn the cable adjustment bolt until it does.


Any questions? You can bring your ride into us and we'll adjust it for you OR take advantage of our Bicycle Limo Service: We'll pick it up, fix it up, and deliver it back to you! Just give us a call at 215-513-7550.

We're guaranteed fun!