Thursday, May 30, 2013

The Six Biggest Mistakes People Make When Choosing a Bike

The wrong ride could leave you in pain (or worse)—avoid these cycling slip-ups when you’re choosing a bike.


Biking is booming, thanks in part to rising gas prices and more cycling-friendly cities. If you’re just getting on board with biking—or even an experienced cyclist looking for an upgrade, you know that choosing a bike can be overwhelming. Make it easy on yourself: These tips from cycling experts will help you avoid common mistakes when you’re choosing a bike so you can get the right fit for you.

As an independent bicycle shop, Indian Valley Bikeworks is more than simply a place to purchase a bike: Unlike many of the superstore chains, we also offer maintenance packages and a wide variety of mechanic-assembled bicycles. We also have a wonderful well-trained staff of professionals eager to offer one-on-one assistance. We even have a terrific cycling club, which can be a great way for a beginner to meet other cyclists.

Buying a bike for fashion, not function. 

Many people buy mountain bikes for their gnarly looks, but never take them off-road. But riding a bike in a different way than what it was designed for can damage the bike, and be uncomfortable for the rider.

When choosing a bike, start by considering the type of riding you want to do: Are you planning to conquer bumpy trails and hills? Then you’ll need a mountain bike. There are many options of mountain bikes depending on how aggressive of terrain you intend to ride. A full suspension bike has more shocks on the front and rear, giving you more control when the trail is difficult.

Are you thinking about taking on a long-distance road ride or getting into road racing or triathlons? Check out skinny-tired road bikes with drop-handles that are built for speed and distance. If your desires are more leisurely—or you’re unsure—you may be in the market for a more general-purpose hybrid bike.

Choosing a bike that doesn’t fit properly.

We can help you with proper bike fitting. While some muscle soreness should be expected when adjusting to a new bike, numbness in the hands, shoulders or saddle area, and knee and/or back pain are signs that a bicycle does not fit correctly.

Generally speaking, you want to have about an inch between the bike and your body when you stand over the top tube, and be able to comfortably reach the brake levers and shifters on the handlebars while positioned on the saddle.

Not trying before you buy.

Every bike fits and feels a little different, so test riding is crucial. We're happy to let you take a ride around to try it out. Once you find one you like, the necessary adjustments, like saddle height and position, can be made to perfect the fit.

Choosing the right frame generally begins with testing the stand-over height, but bike geometry varies by brand and style, so the best way to find the right bike is to try out a few different models and let us help you to find the best fit.

Settling too quickly.

Beginning bikers sometimes don’t take the time to shop around, often settling on a bicycle out of convenience. Then, you run the risk of ending up with a bike that doesn’t fit correctly or you’re simply unhappy with. While bike buying doesn’t need to be a long and stressful process, like anything else, it pays to be patient and do your research. Before you buy, conduct a bit of online research, and ask experienced cyclists for their advice and recommendations.

Cheating yourself by being cheap.

While you don’t necessarily need to buy a top-of-the-line model when you’re just starting out, keep in mind that you get what you pay for. A good entry-level bicycle may run anywhere from $700 to $1,200. Remember that while a quality bike is an investment, it will run more smoothly and last far longer than a cheap one.

More expensive frame materials will be lighter, more responsive, more comfortable and more efficient. There are many wonderful entry-level models available in hybrid, road and mountain bikes. And as you move up in price, your ride quality will increase.

Accessorizing...

Along with the bike, you will need to purchase the necessary accessories like a helmet, spare tube and appropriate cycling apparel. Save some money for accessories as they can improve your cycling experience. A good pair of cycling shorts will make riding your bike much more enjoyable.

Adapted from: http://spryliving.com/articles/the-biggest-mistakes-people-make-when-choosing-a-bike/#ixzz2UoMF6nCo

Call Indian Valley Bikeworks at 215-513-7550 to make an appointment for a bicycle fitting today!

Monday, May 20, 2013

Hot off the Presses: Two New Trek Mountain Bikes

Just launched today are two amazing new Trek models: The Fuel X29 and Remedy 29, combining Trek's industry leading suspension technologies with the handling of G2 geometry, producing the best trail 29ers on the market.


The Insider Details


Trek has been the leader in 29er production for more than a dozen years. In our opinion, they make the best big wheelers on the planet. A larger wheel holds its momentum better, so you keep rolling over rough stuff and maintain your speed through the corners. Increased wheel size also decreases the angle of attack. What does that mean to you, the rider? That makes obstacles seem smaller.

On a Trek 29er, your center of gravity is lower relative to the pivot point (the front axle). This results in a more stable feeling as you sit deeper in the cockpit.

How G2 Geometry comes into play


Conventional wisdom says 29ers have sleepy handling compared to 26" wheel bikes. Trek solved that with G2 Geometry, featuring a custom-offset fork and advanced frame geometry for precise handling at low speed without compromising high-speed stability. It's why Trek 29ers handle better than any others.

Frame Technology


We know that you don't want to think about the frame: how light it is, or the stiffness of the rocker link. You just want the performance that a well-designed ride can give you. EVO Link is Trek's evolution of the rocker link from the plate-to-bolt style use on most suspension bikes to a one-piece rocker link. This lighter link provides a stronger connection point between the front and rear triangles, creating a stiffer frame for greater control with minimal weight.

Trek's designers noticed that most suspension systems attach at the bottom of the shock to a fixed frame mount. That fixed mount can contribute to a harsh ride. They solved that with Full Floater, attaching the shock to two moving linkage points so it can better respond to bumps across a wide variety of terrain. It feels like more travel, but it's not. It's smarter travel.

Pre-order Yours Today


Hey, these rides are so new we don't even have them in stock yet (as of the date of this posting). Give us a call to pre-order yours today!

Indian Valley Bikeworks | 500 Main Street | Harleysville, PA | 215-513-7550
We're guaranteed fun!

Friday, May 17, 2013

Let's Party! Trek's Mamba with G2 Geometry

High Energy Mountain Biking is the Name of the Game

Hey, this video is an "oldie but goody", if you consider something from October 2012 old! The high energy ride keeps your attention up. I think we might have linked this on our Facebook page, but here is is to have another look:



We realize that the bikes used are specialized for the video, we can still make recommendations that will "rock your cycling socks off" and are easily available to "the common man" (or woman).

Trek's Mamba Takes Center Stage


We like the Trek Mamba for lots of reasons. It's one of the best full suspension mountain bikes under $1,000 on the market. The frame is lighweight aluminum and features Gary Fisher's proven G2 geometry (see below). Cushioning the ride is a Rockshox fork that gives you 100mm of travel for this 29er.

Mores features includes Bontrager disc wheels with Hayes disc brakes, along with solid shifting from Shimano. In our humble opinions, you can do everything in the video and more with the Mamba.

What's more, a well-cared for bike can last for years, so this is also a good investment. All our bikes come with a lifetime of annual check-ups for your ride.

How G2 Geometry Works


Trek's G2 Geometry (version 2 of Gary Fisher's Genesis Geometry) delivers the ultimate ride for every trail. Genesis earned rave reviews for awesome handling on climbs and descents thanks to a long top tube paired with a short stem that moves the front wheel forward for top-notch confidence and control, while short chainstays add phenomenal traction. G2 Geometry takes these handling traits to the next level by boosting control on tight singletrack and technical climbs, too. This is accomplished by increasing the amount of fork offset (reducing trail), which makes G2 bikes steer more quickly, and by shortening the reach, which puts more weight on the front wheel for even better control and confidence. The two animations above showcase how G2 Geometry provides the perfect ride.

Come by the store for a test drive this weekend. We'll give you a little "shock and awe"!

Monday, May 6, 2013

The 2013 National Bike Challenge is Under Way


National Bike Month is off the a fast and furious roll with the National Bike Challenge and, this Wednesday marks the second annual National Bike to School Day. And it gets better - May 13th is Bike to Work Day!

Thanks to our friends at The League of American Bicyclists, we are getting all the scoop on nationwide activities that we can share right here in our area.

Healthy You... Healthy Environment

What's good for the soul and great for everyone's health? Bicycling! More biking means less pollution and healthier living. As the country fights obesity in epidemic proportions, increasing levels of bicycle usage among our youth is more important than ever.

The American College of Cardiology is also sponsoring a bike riding challenge as they encourage folks to "hop on a bike", whether it's in the open or at the gym. Just try out their Cardiosmart activity tracker and you might be eligible to win a new bike!

It's Family Time!

What's more important than a good quality bike for kids? It's really critical that the bike be sized properly for the child, and that it is fitted properly as well. It's not just the height of the bike that needs to be considered, but other kid-sized components as well, such as grip circumference.

What's hot right now? Kid's and parents are really into the Trek MT220. This bike is perfect for the 7-12 year old crowd. This is a sturdy ride, yet nimble, with a 21-speed Shimano drivetrain, making it easy for the young mountain biker to climb higher and ride further. Not to mention the great kid friendly colors.

We did a video on kids' bikes a few months ago - have another look:



Get Out and Ride!

National Bike Month is an opportunity to celebrate the unique power of the bicycle and the many reasons we ride. Whether you bike to work or school; to save money or time; to preserve health or the environment, riding is a great thing! See you on the trails!

Friday, May 3, 2013

May is Bike Month!


Family biking

Let's put up our kickstands and celebrate!

How should we celebrate at Bikeworks? How about a "tip of the helmet" to bike safety?

We're kicking things off with our first Saturday "Fix a Flat" Seminar. Just stop by the store at 9:30AM and we'll show you how to change a flat in (pardon the pun) no time flat! (We couldn't help ourselves!)

A bicycle that is properly cared for will be safer to ride, and will give you fewer problems on the road. Here are a few tips to make your ride go smoothly:
  • Get a once-a-year tune-up
  • Obey all traffic signs and lights
  • Be alert. Be visible. Be predictable.
  • Avoid riding on sidewalks
  • Always ride with traffic
  • Use hand signals
  • Wear a helmet (pictured below is our Clash Lazer Helmet - lightweight with extra rear coverage and available in four smashing color combos)
Clash Lazer Helmet
Need a tune-up? Most folks don't know that bikes need a "doctor visit" once a year, just like people. We'll be sure that everything is in tip top shape. Just visit our service page for a complete list of services. OR are you REALLY busy and can't bring your bike to the shop? NO PROBLEM! We have a special "Limo Service" just for your bike. We'll pick it up, give it a tune-up or complete overhaul, what ever it takes, and bring it back to you.

Even if you didn't purchase your bike from us, we can service it. By the way, we also service special needs bikes and wheelchairs.

We've already identified twenty-five common cycling issues, with ways to fix 'em yourself. But if you still need help with that squeaky wheel, stop by to see us! We're open seven days and are here to serve your biking needs.

HAPPY BICYCLE MONTH! RIDE SAFELY!

Thanks for an awesome Carnival!




Thanks to everyone for coming out and making the day a sweet success. The weather cooperated, and fun, food, and bicycle-mania was enjoyed by all.

Congratulations to our raffle winners:

Grand Prize: 2013 Trek 8.3 DS - Frank F.. Lansdale, PA
2nd Prize: Cycleops Magneto Trainer - Caroline D., Willow Grive, PA
3rd Prize: Fizik Arione R3 - Randy S., Perkiomenville, PA

Enjoy the slides above, or see them on our Facebook Page, and stop by if we can help with anything!

Wednesday, May 1, 2013

Bontrager Tubeless Ready Wheelsets: Race, Race Lite, Race X Lite (R2, R3)


Want Better Traction and A Smoother Ride? Consider Going Tubeless. Bontrager Has Great Options in the Way of TLR Wheelsets.




(image courtesy of slowtwitch.com)
Bontrager offers tubeless ready wheels in their Race, Race Lite, and Race X Lite trims, as well as R2 and R3 level Tubeless Ready road tires in 23 and 25mm that are all up to Bontrager's standards for quality and performance.

All the wheels can be run with standard tube tires, or tubeless with the TLR system. THey are virtually maintenance free, and because of the design of the TLR rim strips, there is a low weight penalty for tubes and tires at stock specifications.

There are two ways to go tubeless with the new wheels and tires. If you bought a Trek bike that was equipped with compatible Race, Race Lite, or Race X Lite wheels, Bontrager has a convenient TLR upgrade kit that includes everything you need to make the switch: tires, rim strips, valve stems, sealant, even a valve core removal tool.